art authority
Art Authority is the developer behind the award-winning line of classic art viewing apps. The Art Authority app line, and associated community Web site, provides access to over 60,000 paintings and sculptures from over 1000 western artists and 900 museums and other art sites. The app was named to Apple's 2010 and 2011 Rewind lists as best iPad reference app, as well as one of the top 25 apps of all time at Macworld/iWorld.

In addition to bringing great art to the world, and the world to great art (through our Art Alert app), we're also very proud to sponsor the Art Authority Summer Intern Program, currently in its third year.
The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet, 1844. (Private Collection) Oil on canvas. 45 x 55 cm. 
Gustave Courbet completed many self-portraits in the early 1840s, yet this is the most striking of his productions. Such sustained interest in depicting himself reveals Courbet’s early interest in self-investigation and self-fashioning as a self-taught artist, as well as the requisite desire to advance the image of oneself as an artist. Here, Courbet illustrates himself as a rather manic and dramatic individual. Heavy chiaroscuro effects lend to the theatricality and intensity, making up for the rather awkward foreshortening of his arms and strange flatness of his clothing. Indeed, this early in his career, Courbet was still entrenched in the Romanticist wave of art in Europe, but the relatively unflattering color palette already hints at his interest in what he would soon come to term “realism” - the pursuit of absolute truth and the abolishment of artificiality in art. 
For more Gustave Courbet visit Art Authority and download the award-winning app, available for iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet, 1844. (Private Collection) Oil on canvas. 45 x 55 cm. 

Gustave Courbet completed many self-portraits in the early 1840s, yet this is the most striking of his productions. Such sustained interest in depicting himself reveals Courbet’s early interest in self-investigation and self-fashioning as a self-taught artist, as well as the requisite desire to advance the image of oneself as an artist. Here, Courbet illustrates himself as a rather manic and dramatic individual. Heavy chiaroscuro effects lend to the theatricality and intensity, making up for the rather awkward foreshortening of his arms and strange flatness of his clothing. Indeed, this early in his career, Courbet was still entrenched in the Romanticist wave of art in Europe, but the relatively unflattering color palette already hints at his interest in what he would soon come to term “realism” - the pursuit of absolute truth and the abolishment of artificiality in art. 

For more Gustave Courbet visit Art Authority and download the award-winning app, available for iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

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